IBD: Crohn's Disease

Survey: Support Canada’s IBD Nurses

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The Canadian Digestive Health Foundation (CDHF) is conducting a national survey to best understand the experiences and relationships Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) patients and their caregivers have with their health care providers, specifically IBD nurses. Our goal is to understand patient accessibility, communication practices with patients and their caregivers, and the impact Canada’s IBD nurses have on patient care, disease management and quality of life. Please help us by completing this confidential survey

Do you have Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)?

Please take our Patient Survey

Duration: 10 minutes

Please help us by completing this confidential survey.

Are you a Caregiver of someone with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)?

Please take our Caregiver Survey

Duration: 10 minutes

Please help us by completing this confidential survey

Are you a Gastroenterologist?

Please take our GI Survey

Duration: 10 minutes

Please help us by completing this confidential survey

Are you an IBD Nurse?

Please take our Nurse Survey

Duration: 10 minutes

Please help us by completing this confidential survey


Learn more about Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD):

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is at least two, separate disorders that cause inflammation (redness and swelling) and ulceration (sores) of the small and large intestines. These two disorders are called ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. 

Crohn’s disease can occur anywhere in the digestive tract but is common in the lower small bowel (ileum) or large bowel. 

Ulcerative colitis is a chronic disorder affecting the large intestine (colon). The digestive system (including the stomach, small and large intestines) converts food into nutrients and absorbs them into the bloodstream to fuel our bodies. The colon’s main role is to absorb water and salts from undigested food waste. This action helps to thicken and solidify the stool, which is then expelled from the body through the anus. 

Ulcerative colitis causes inflammation (redness and swelling) and ulceration (sores) along the lining of the colon, which can lead to abdominal pain, cramps, bleeding and diarrhea. The disease usually begins in the rectal area, which holds stool until you go to the bathroom, and may involve the entire colon over time. Ulcerative colitis is classified as an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), due to the inflammation that occurs in the intestines. Another common form of IBD is called Crohn’s disease. Although the symptoms of ulcerative colitis are similar to Crohn’s disease, the conditions are different in several ways. 

While both ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are types of IBD, they should not be confused with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). IBS affects the muscle contractions and the sensitivity of the colon. Unlike ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, IBS does not cause intestinal inflammation nor damage the bowel.

Newly Diagnosed?

Click here to view our IBD Toolkit.

Survey: Support Canada’s IBD Nurses

The Canadian Digestive Health Foundation (CDHF) is conducting a national survey to best understand the experiences and relationships Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) patients and their caregivers have with their health care providers, specifically IBD nurses. Our goal is to understand patient accessibility, communication practices with patients and their caregivers, and the impact Canada’s IBD nurses have on patient care, disease management and quality of life. Please help us by completing this confidential survey

Do you have Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)?

Please take our Patient Survey

Duration: 10 minutes

Please help us by completing this confidential survey.

Are you a Caregiver of someone with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)?

Please take our Caregiver Survey

Duration: 10 minutes

Please help us by completing this confidential survey

Are you a Gastroenterologist?

Please take our GI Survey

Duration: 10 minutes

Please help us by completing this confidential survey

Are you an IBD Nurse?

Please take our Nurse Survey

Duration: 10 minutes

Please help us by completing this confidential survey


Learn more about Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD):

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is at least two, separate disorders that cause inflammation (redness and swelling) and ulceration (sores) of the small and large intestines. These two disorders are called ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. 

Crohn’s disease can occur anywhere in the digestive tract but is common in the lower small bowel (ileum) or large bowel. 

Ulcerative colitis is a chronic disorder affecting the large intestine (colon). The digestive system (including the stomach, small and large intestines) converts food into nutrients and absorbs them into the bloodstream to fuel our bodies. The colon’s main role is to absorb water and salts from undigested food waste. This action helps to thicken and solidify the stool, which is then expelled from the body through the anus. 

Ulcerative colitis causes inflammation (redness and swelling) and ulceration (sores) along the lining of the colon, which can lead to abdominal pain, cramps, bleeding and diarrhea. The disease usually begins in the rectal area, which holds stool until you go to the bathroom, and may involve the entire colon over time. Ulcerative colitis is classified as an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), due to the inflammation that occurs in the intestines. Another common form of IBD is called Crohn’s disease. Although the symptoms of ulcerative colitis are similar to Crohn’s disease, the conditions are different in several ways. 

While both ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are types of IBD, they should not be confused with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). IBS affects the muscle contractions and the sensitivity of the colon. Unlike ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, IBS does not cause intestinal inflammation nor damage the bowel.

Newly Diagnosed?

Click here to view our IBD Toolkit.