IBD: Crohn's Disease

Tests and Treatment

Treating Crohn’s Disease

Although several drugs are useful in controlling these conditions, as yet a cure has not been found. Since the disease is not curable, long-term treatment is often required.

Medications

These include anti-inflammatory drugs (sulfasalazine/5-ASA), corticosteroids (prednisone and budesonide),immunosuppressives (methotrexate and azathioprine) and immunomodulatory agents (infliximab). Some of these may be given by different methods including oral, rectal and intravenously. Antibiotics may be useful in certain circumstances for Crohn’s disease.

Benefits and Risk Assessment Tool

Click through our online e-learning tool below to explore the different medications and treatment options for IBD. Remember, no treatment is NOT an option!


Sometimes, additional action may be required to achieve remission. Below are some auxiliary treatment options that may be suggested by your doctor.

Symptomatic treatment

Specific medications are used to treat diarrhea and abdominal cramps. Anti-diarrheal drugs slow the muscles of the intestine which in turn slow the passage of stool through the body and help with diarrhea. While abdominal pain often occurs with IBD, it is important to note that the pain is a consequence of the disease and, if treated appropriately, the pain should subside. People with IBD should be careful to avoid taking an excess of pain killers and anti-diarrheal drugs since this may lead to complications.

Dietary treatment

Diet alone is not effective in treating Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. However, it is important that patients with IBD have a well-balanced diet. Calcium is important to protect bones. Fibre may not be tolerated during flare ups. Certain vitamins (for example, B12) may be required. Selected patients may sometimes be helped by a registered dietitian.

Surgery

People with both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis may need surgery at some point in their lives. Surgery is less common in ulcerative colitis than in Crohn’s disease and is often performed when ulcerative colitis is no longer responding to medical treatment. Unlike Crohn’s disease, surgery will cure ulcerative colitis by removing all diseased bowel. With the colon being completely removed the patient may require an ileostomy (bag outside the body to collect waste) or a second operation to form a new rectum (called a pouch procedure). Despite all of the advances in medical research over the last several decades, we still do not know the cause of IBD and much further research is required.

Testing for Crohn’s Disease

Tests are needed to determine whether the patient has ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease and to rule out other causes. To diagnose these disorders the doctor will take a complete history and perform a physical examination. In addition, blood tests are used to find out if you are anemic (low blood count) as a result of blood loss, or if there is an increased number of white blood cells in your body, suggesting an inflammatory process 

Stool samples can tell your doctor if there is blood loss or if an infection by a parasite or bacteria is causing some of your symptoms. 

The doctor may also look inside your rectum and large bowel through a long, flexible video camera called an endoscope. During this safe procedure, samples of the lining of the intestine (biopsies) may be taken to be looked at under the microscope. 

On some occasions an X-ray exam may be required. This is done by putting barium (a white chalky solution) into the upper intestine (swallowing barium) or by putting the barium into the bowel by inserting a tube into the anus

Tests and Treatment

Treating Crohn's Disease

Although several drugs are useful in controlling these conditions, as yet a cure has not been found. Since the disease is not curable, long-term treatment is often required.

Medications

These include anti-inflammatory drugs (sulfasalazine/5-ASA), corticosteroids (prednisone and budesonide),immunosuppressives (methotrexate and azathioprine) and immunomodulatory agents (infliximab). Some of these may be given by different methods including oral, rectal and intravenously. Antibiotics may be useful in certain circumstances for Crohn's disease.

Benefits and Risk Assessment Tool

Click through our online e-learning tool below to explore the different medications and treatment options for IBD. Remember, no treatment is NOT an option!


Sometimes, additional action may be required to achieve remission. Below are some auxiliary treatment options that may be suggested by your doctor.

Symptomatic treatment

Specific medications are used to treat diarrhea and abdominal cramps. Anti-diarrheal drugs slow the muscles of the intestine which in turn slow the passage of stool through the body and help with diarrhea. While abdominal pain often occurs with IBD, it is important to note that the pain is a consequence of the disease and, if treated appropriately, the pain should subside. People with IBD should be careful to avoid taking an excess of pain killers and anti-diarrheal drugs since this may lead to complications.

Dietary treatment

Diet alone is not effective in treating Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. However, it is important that patients with IBD have a well-balanced diet. Calcium is important to protect bones. Fibre may not be tolerated during flare ups. Certain vitamins (for example, B12) may be required. Selected patients may sometimes be helped by a registered dietitian.

Surgery

People with both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis may need surgery at some point in their lives. Surgery is less common in ulcerative colitis than in Crohn's disease and is often performed when ulcerative colitis is no longer responding to medical treatment. Unlike Crohn's disease, surgery will cure ulcerative colitis by removing all diseased bowel. With the colon being completely removed the patient may require an ileostomy (bag outside the body to collect waste) or a second operation to form a new rectum (called a pouch procedure). Despite all of the advances in medical research over the last several decades, we still do not know the cause of IBD and much further research is required.

Testing for Crohn's Disease

Tests are needed to determine whether the patient has ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease and to rule out other causes. To diagnose these disorders the doctor will take a complete history and perform a physical examination. In addition, blood tests are used to find out if you are anemic (low blood count) as a result of blood loss, or if there is an increased number of white blood cells in your body, suggesting an inflammatory process 

Stool samples can tell your doctor if there is blood loss or if an infection by a parasite or bacteria is causing some of your symptoms. 

The doctor may also look inside your rectum and large bowel through a long, flexible video camera called an endoscope. During this safe procedure, samples of the lining of the intestine (biopsies) may be taken to be looked at under the microscope. 

On some occasions an X-ray exam may be required. This is done by putting barium (a white chalky solution) into the upper intestine (swallowing barium) or by putting the barium into the bowel by inserting a tube into the anus

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