Gastroparesis

Preparing for an Appointment

You’re likely to first see your primary care doctor if you have signs and symptoms of gastroparesis. If your doctor agree that your symptoms point to gastroparesis, you may be referred to a gastroenterologist ( a specialist in digestive diseases.) You may also be referred to a dietitian who can help you manage your diet plan.

What you can do:

Because appointments can be quick, it’s important to be well-prepared. To get ready, try to:

  • Be aware of any pre-appointment protocols. When you make your appointment, be sure to inquire if there’s anything you need to do in advance, such as restrict your diet. The doctor’s office might request that you stop using certain medications, prior to coming for an appointment. • Record any symptoms you’ve experienced, including any that may not seem related.
  • Write down key personal information, including any major stresses or recent life changes.
  • Make a list of all medications, vitamins or supplements that you’re taking.
  • Consider taking a family member or a friend with you. It can often be tough to recall all the information provided during an appointment. A friend of family member may be able to help you remember something you forgot down the road.

Questions to ask your doctor if you think you have gastropresis:

Prepare a list of questions ahead of time to ensure that you optimize your time with your doctor or specialist. Take this list of questions to ask your doctor if you’re worried you have gastroparesis with you to your next appointment:

  • What’s the most likely cause of my symptoms?
  • Could any of my medications be causing my signs and symptoms
  • What kinds of tests do I need?
  • Is this condition temporary or long lasting?
  • Do I need treatment for my gastroparesis?
  • Should I see a dietitian?
  • What are my treatment options, and what are the potential side effects?
  • I have diabetes, how will gastroparesis affect my diabetes management?

Preparing for an Appointment

You're likely to first see your primary care doctor if you have signs and symptoms of gastroparesis. If your doctor agree that your symptoms point to gastroparesis, you may be referred to a gastroenterologist ( a specialist in digestive diseases.) You may also be referred to a dietitian who can help you manage your diet plan.

What you can do:

Because appointments can be quick, it's important to be well-prepared. To get ready, try to:

  • Be aware of any pre-appointment protocols. When you make your appointment, be sure to inquire if there's anything you need to do in advance, such as restrict your diet. The doctor's office might request that you stop using certain medications, prior to coming for an appointment. • Record any symptoms you've experienced, including any that may not seem related.
  • Write down key personal information, including any major stresses or recent life changes.
  • Make a list of all medications, vitamins or supplements that you're taking.
  • Consider taking a family member or a friend with you. It can often be tough to recall all the information provided during an appointment. A friend of family member may be able to help you remember something you forgot down the road.

Questions to ask your doctor if you think you have gastropresis:

Prepare a list of questions ahead of time to ensure that you optimize your time with your doctor or specialist. Take this list of questions to ask your doctor if you're worried you have gastroparesis with you to your next appointment:

  • What's the most likely cause of my symptoms?
  • Could any of my medications be causing my signs and symptoms
  • What kinds of tests do I need?
  • Is this condition temporary or long lasting?
  • Do I need treatment for my gastroparesis?
  • Should I see a dietitian?
  • What are my treatment options, and what are the potential side effects?
  • I have diabetes, how will gastroparesis affect my diabetes management?
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