GERD

CDHF Talks: GERD and Barrett’s Esophagus

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the result of a disordered valve mechanism between the esophagus (swallowing tube) and the stomach. The valve, or lower esophageal sphincter (LES), opens during swallowing to allow food to enter the stomach and then closes to prevent food and stomach secretions from moving backward into the esophagus. When the LES fails to close correctly, the stomach contents—which are acidic and contain digestive secretions—can flow back into the esophagus. This reverse flow (reflux) of food, acids and the digestive enzyme pepsin, can cause damage to the esophageal lining and resulting heartburn. When diagnosis and treatment are delayed, chronic GERD can increase the risk for serious health complications, including Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal cancer. Barrett’s esophagus describes a condition where the cells lining the lower esophagus change. The esophagus is the swallowing tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach.

In this series of videos, Dr. Jeff Mosko and Dr. Gail Darling go over all things GERD, its relationship to Barrett’s esophagus, the benefits of getting screened early, what are some of the treatment options, and advocating for your own health! Watch the full version or skip to each section to find the answers you are looking for.

Full Version:

Part 1: Overview of GERD

  • What is Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)?
  • What are the common symptoms of GERD?
  • What is the impact of Chronic GERD?
  • Who is at risk?

References:

GERD Symptoms: Typical and Atypical. http://www.gerdhelp.com/about-gerd/symptoms/. Accessed on January 4, 2017.

What are the symptoms of GER and GERD? https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/acid-reflux-ger-gerd-adults/symptoms-causes. Accessed on January 4, 2017.

American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, https://www.asge.org/home/for-patients/patient-information/understanding-gerd-barrett-39-s

Part 2: Advanced Screening and Early Diagnosis

  • What are the benefits of screening for Barrett’s Esophagus?

References

Canadian Cancer Society. Canadian Cancer Statistics 2019. Special topic: Pancreatic Cancer

Part 3: What are the new screening options for Barrett’s Esophagus?

Part 4: Treatment Options for Barrett’s Esophagus

  • What are the treatment options?
  • What is radiofrequency ablation?

Part 5: Continuity of Care

  • Being your own advocate
  • What do guidelines say?

References

Shaheen NJ, Weinberg DS, Denberg TD, et al. Upper endoscopy for gastroesophageal reflux disease: best practice advice from the clinical guidelines committee of the American College of Physicians. Ann Intern Med. 2012;157(11):808-816.

Katz PO, Gerson LB, Vela MF. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Am J Gastroenterol. 2013;108(3):308-28.

ASGE Standards of Practice Committee, Evans JA, Early DS, et al. The role of endoscopy in Barrett’s esophagus and other premalignant conditions of the esophagus. Gastrointest Endosc. 2012;76(6):1087-94. 

Part 6: Current Resources and Outlook

For additional information on GERD, click here.

For additional information on Barrett’s Esophagus, click here.


References

  1. Dymedex Market Development Consulting, GERD Sizing and Segmentation for pH Testing. February 13, 2015.

These resources were made possible through a partnership between Medtronic and CDHF

CDHF Talks: GERD and Barrett’s Esophagus

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the result of a disordered valve mechanism between the esophagus (swallowing tube) and the stomach. The valve, or lower esophageal sphincter (LES), opens during swallowing to allow food to enter the stomach and then closes to prevent food and stomach secretions from moving backward into the esophagus. When the LES fails to close correctly, the stomach contents—which are acidic and contain digestive secretions—can flow back into the esophagus. This reverse flow (reflux) of food, acids and the digestive enzyme pepsin, can cause damage to the esophageal lining and resulting heartburn. When diagnosis and treatment are delayed, chronic GERD can increase the risk for serious health complications, including Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal cancer. Barrett’s esophagus describes a condition where the cells lining the lower esophagus change. The esophagus is the swallowing tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach.

In this series of videos, Dr. Jeff Mosko and Dr. Gail Darling go over all things GERD, its relationship to Barrett’s esophagus, the benefits of getting screened early, what are some of the treatment options, and advocating for your own health! Watch the full version or skip to each section to find the answers you are looking for.

Full Version:

Part 1: Overview of GERD

  • What is Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)?
  • What are the common symptoms of GERD?
  • What is the impact of Chronic GERD?
  • Who is at risk?

References:

GERD Symptoms: Typical and Atypical. http://www.gerdhelp.com/about-gerd/symptoms/. Accessed on January 4, 2017.

What are the symptoms of GER and GERD? https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/acid-reflux-ger-gerd-adults/symptoms-causes. Accessed on January 4, 2017.

American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, https://www.asge.org/home/for-patients/patient-information/understanding-gerd-barrett-39-s

Part 2: Advanced Screening and Early Diagnosis

  • What are the benefits of screening for Barrett’s Esophagus?

References

Canadian Cancer Society. Canadian Cancer Statistics 2019. Special topic: Pancreatic Cancer

Part 3: What are the new screening options for Barrett’s Esophagus?

Part 4: Treatment Options for Barrett's Esophagus

  • What are the treatment options?
  • What is radiofrequency ablation?

Part 5: Continuity of Care

  • Being your own advocate
  • What do guidelines say?

References

Shaheen NJ, Weinberg DS, Denberg TD, et al. Upper endoscopy for gastroesophageal reflux disease: best practice advice from the clinical guidelines committee of the American College of Physicians. Ann Intern Med. 2012;157(11):808-816.

Katz PO, Gerson LB, Vela MF. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Am J Gastroenterol. 2013;108(3):308-28.

ASGE Standards of Practice Committee, Evans JA, Early DS, et al. The role of endoscopy in Barrett’s esophagus and other premalignant conditions of the esophagus. Gastrointest Endosc. 2012;76(6):1087-94. 

Part 6: Current Resources and Outlook

For additional information on GERD, click here.

For additional information on Barrett's Esophagus, click here.


References

  1. Dymedex Market Development Consulting, GERD Sizing and Segmentation for pH Testing. February 13, 2015.
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