Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Tests and Treatment

Testing for Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

Often, symptoms alone can provide doctors with the information they need to diagnose IBS. Your doctor will perform a physical examination and take a complete medical history that includes a careful review of your symptoms. For this reason, it is important to be candid and specific with your doctor about the problems you are having. A set of specific symptom criteria (referred to by physicians as the Rome IV Criteria) has been developed to help physicians diagnose IBS.

Rome IV Criteria

In May 2016, the Rome Foundation released the new Rome IV criteria for diagnosing IBS. All around the world, physicians follow this organization’s lead when diagnosing IBS.

According to the Rome IV diagnostic criteria, IBS is characterised by recurrent abdominal pain for, on average, at least one day per week in the last three months, associated with two or more of the following:

  • Symptoms related to defecation
  • Symptoms associated with a change in stool frequency
  • Symptoms associated with a change in form (appearance) of stool

Treating Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

Take comfort in knowing that IBS is an extremely common problem, and in many cases, simple changes in your lifestyle and diet can provide symptom relief. However, no one treatment works for everyone and treatment will depend on the types of symptoms you have, their severity and how they affect your daily life.

Your doctor may recommend prescription or over the counter products if your IBS symptoms are severe and if lifestyle and dietary strategies have not helped. Typically, medications are targeted at the dominant symptom – diarrhea, constipation or pain.

  • Antispasmodic medications may help reduce muscle spasms, abdominal pain and cramping.
  • Antidepressant medications, in low doses, act on the chemical messengers in the digestive tract and can help relieve diarrhea, pain and cramping. In higher doses, these medications help to relieve depression and anxiety that may accompany IBS.
  • Antidiarrheal medications, such as Loperamide, can help control diarrhea by reducing stool frequency and slowing the movement of the intestines.
  • Laxatives speed up the motion of stool through the intestines and may be prescribed for people who have IBS with constipation. Laxatives are available in prescription or over-the-counter formulations. Speak to your doctor about which one is best for you.
  • Prosecretory and analgesic agents, which increase the amount of fluid in the digestive tract as well as reduce the sensitivity of pain nerves in the intestines. They have been shown to soften bowel movements and make them occur more often, reduce the amount of bloating and to decrease abdominal pain in patients with IBS.

Treating irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C)

It is important to find a solution that works best for you so you can find relief and enjoy the best quality of life possible despite IBS-C. Your healthcare provider will try to help you manage your symptoms. Recommendations generally begin with changes to lifestyle and diet. If those changes do not bring relief, over-the-counter (OTC) products or prescription medications may be prescribed.

Medications

While lifestyle and dietary changes can play a role in helping manage mild IBS-C symptoms, if your symptoms do not improve or even worsen, you may require further intervention. Over the Counter (OTC) and prescription therapies are available for treating IBS-C. OTC medications are recommended for short term/occasional use. If you symptoms are still unresolved, you should consult with your health care provider. With the right medication, you should find relief and prevent IBS-C from inhibiting your everyday activities and quality of life.

OTC therapies for IBS-C:

  • Osmotic laxatives: are non-stimulant laxatives that draw water into the colon, increase bowel movements and allow stool to pass through the colon more easily.
  • Bulk-forming laxatives are non-stimulants containing fibre. Fibre brings water into the colon, softens and increases the bulk of stool, and softens stool. Psyllium or methylcellulose are the most common bulking laxatives used.
  • Stool softeners are non-stimulants, which soften the stool by reducing surface tension and allowing intestinal fluids to penetrate the stool to make it softer and easier to pass. Stimulant laxatives stimulate the nerves and muscles of the intestine to trigger a bowel movement by increasing contractions of muscles in the intestine. This helps stool pass through the colon more quickly.

Prescription Medications for IBS-C

Some IBS-C patients do not find relief with lifestyle and diet changes nor over the counter medications. These individuals need safe and effective long-term therapies. There are currently two classes of prescription medications that may help. These are:

  • Prokinetic agents which stimulate movement and contractions of the bowel. This increases the speed with which stool travel through the digestive system, increases frequency of bowel movements, and reduces IBS-C symptoms.
  • Prosecretory and analgesic agents increase the amount of fluid in the digestive tract as well as reduce the sensitivity of pain nerves in the intestines. They have been shown to soften bowel movements and make them occur more often, reduce the amount of bloating and to decrease abdominal pain in patients with IBS-C.
  • Identify food triggers – Tracking foods you eat and logging the times you experienced symptoms/distress may help reveal connections between food and IBS-D. You should take detailed notes that should include the types and amounts of foods eaten and the time of consumption. It’s important to also record the time and description of distressing bowel events or related pain and discomfort. Below are some dietary considerations which you may want to discuss with your doctor and/or registered dietitian.
  • High-fat foods may worsen symptoms of IBS-D
  • Dairy products – lactose free products may be better tolerated
  • Avoid alcohol
  • A reduction of caffeine may be beneficial. This includes caffeinated drinks, such as coffee, tea, colas and energy drinks
  • Sorbitol sweeteners (found in some chewing gum) may be problematic
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Probiotic supplements such as lactobacillus acidophilus may help alleviate IBS symptoms including abdominal pain, bloating, and bowel movement irregularity. Ask your health care professional for more information.
  • A diet low in FODMAPs (fermentable oligo-saccharides, di-saccharides, mono-saccharides, and polyols), a group of short-chain carbohydrates, may help relieve symptoms. The diet is used in the short-term followed by re-introduction to assess tolerance to individual foods. Consult your health-care professional for more information.
  • Eating large meals also may trigger abdominal cramping and diarrhea. It’s best to eat smaller meals.
  • Fibre may be helpful in reducing symptoms of IBS-D. If a trial of a fiber supplement such as psyllium is used, fiber should be added gradually, because it initially may worsen bloating and gassiness. If you have IBS-D, look for foods with more soluble fiber, the type that takes longer to digest (such as that found in oats).
  • Stress is considered one of the triggers of IBS symptoms. Here are some healthy habits that may also help reduce IBS symptoms.
  • Exercise may improve and could reduce stress.
  • Get enough rest. This allows your body to maintain basic function, repair and manage stress.
  • Use relaxation techniques: deep breathing, visualization, Yoga.
  • Consult a professional trained in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Gut Directed Hypnotherapy.

Medications for IBS-D

While lifestyle and dietary changes can play a role in helping manage mild IBS-D symptoms, if your symptoms do not improve, you may require further intervention. Over the Counter (OTC) and prescription therapies are available for treating IBS-D.

OTC medications are recommended for short term/occasional use. If your symptoms are still unresolved, you should consult with your health care provider. With the right medication, you may find relief and prevent IBS-D from inhibiting your everyday activities and quality of life.

OTC therapies for IBS-D

  • Peppermint oil
  • probiotics
  • fiber
  • alpha galactosidase enzymes (e.g. Beano), simethicone, although efficacy with many products is not proven.

Prescription Drugs for IBS-D

IBS-D patients suffer from a multitude of symptoms including abdominal pain, bloating, and diarrhea. The commonly used prescription drugs only address a single symptom rather than the constellation of symptoms observed in IBS-D patients. Recent advancements in the treatment of IBS have produced newer medications that not only treat the multiple symptoms but have been specifically studied and approved for use by Health Canada in IBS-D patients.

Physicians may now prescribe one or a combination of drugs that:

  • reduce abdominal pain by blocking the pain signals to the brain
  • relax the muscles in the gut to reduce diarrhea and the urgent, uncontrollable need to use the washroom (urgency)
  • reduce both abdominal and bowel symptoms including pain, bloating, urgency and diarrhea Your doctor can determine if a combination or a single treatment is right for you.

Think you may have IBS? Read this article.

Tests and Treatment

Testing for Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

Often, symptoms alone can provide doctors with the information they need to diagnose IBS. Your doctor will perform a physical examination and take a complete medical history that includes a careful review of your symptoms. For this reason, it is important to be candid and specific with your doctor about the problems you are having. A set of specific symptom criteria (referred to by physicians as the Rome IV Criteria) has been developed to help physicians diagnose IBS.

Rome IV Criteria

In May 2016, the Rome Foundation released the new Rome IV criteria for diagnosing IBS. All around the world, physicians follow this organization’s lead when diagnosing IBS.

According to the Rome IV diagnostic criteria, IBS is characterised by recurrent abdominal pain for, on average, at least one day per week in the last three months, associated with two or more of the following:

  • Symptoms related to defecation
  • Symptoms associated with a change in stool frequency
  • Symptoms associated with a change in form (appearance) of stool

Treating Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

Take comfort in knowing that IBS is an extremely common problem, and in many cases, simple changes in your lifestyle and diet can provide symptom relief. However, no one treatment works for everyone and treatment will depend on the types of symptoms you have, their severity and how they affect your daily life.

Your doctor may recommend prescription or over the counter products if your IBS symptoms are severe and if lifestyle and dietary strategies have not helped. Typically, medications are targeted at the dominant symptom – diarrhea, constipation or pain.

  • Antispasmodic medications may help reduce muscle spasms, abdominal pain and cramping.
  • Antidepressant medications, in low doses, act on the chemical messengers in the digestive tract and can help relieve diarrhea, pain and cramping. In higher doses, these medications help to relieve depression and anxiety that may accompany IBS.
  • Antidiarrheal medications, such as Loperamide, can help control diarrhea by reducing stool frequency and slowing the movement of the intestines.
  • Laxatives speed up the motion of stool through the intestines and may be prescribed for people who have IBS with constipation. Laxatives are available in prescription or over-the-counter formulations. Speak to your doctor about which one is best for you.
  • Prosecretory and analgesic agents, which increase the amount of fluid in the digestive tract as well as reduce the sensitivity of pain nerves in the intestines. They have been shown to soften bowel movements and make them occur more often, reduce the amount of bloating and to decrease abdominal pain in patients with IBS.

Treating irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C)

It is important to find a solution that works best for you so you can find relief and enjoy the best quality of life possible despite IBS-C. Your healthcare provider will try to help you manage your symptoms. Recommendations generally begin with changes to lifestyle and diet. If those changes do not bring relief, over-the-counter (OTC) products or prescription medications may be prescribed.

Medications

While lifestyle and dietary changes can play a role in helping manage mild IBS-C symptoms, if your symptoms do not improve or even worsen, you may require further intervention. Over the Counter (OTC) and prescription therapies are available for treating IBS-C. OTC medications are recommended for short term/occasional use. If you symptoms are still unresolved, you should consult with your health care provider. With the right medication, you should find relief and prevent IBS-C from inhibiting your everyday activities and quality of life.

OTC therapies for IBS-C:

  • Osmotic laxatives: are non-stimulant laxatives that draw water into the colon, increase bowel movements and allow stool to pass through the colon more easily.
  • Bulk-forming laxatives are non-stimulants containing fibre. Fibre brings water into the colon, softens and increases the bulk of stool, and softens stool. Psyllium or methylcellulose are the most common bulking laxatives used.
  • Stool softeners are non-stimulants, which soften the stool by reducing surface tension and allowing intestinal fluids to penetrate the stool to make it softer and easier to pass. Stimulant laxatives stimulate the nerves and muscles of the intestine to trigger a bowel movement by increasing contractions of muscles in the intestine. This helps stool pass through the colon more quickly.

Prescription Medications for IBS-C

Some IBS-C patients do not find relief with lifestyle and diet changes nor over the counter medications. These individuals need safe and effective long-term therapies. There are currently two classes of prescription medications that may help. These are:

  • Prokinetic agents which stimulate movement and contractions of the bowel. This increases the speed with which stool travel through the digestive system, increases frequency of bowel movements, and reduces IBS-C symptoms.
  • Prosecretory and analgesic agents increase the amount of fluid in the digestive tract as well as reduce the sensitivity of pain nerves in the intestines. They have been shown to soften bowel movements and make them occur more often, reduce the amount of bloating and to decrease abdominal pain in patients with IBS-C.
  • Identify food triggers – Tracking foods you eat and logging the times you experienced symptoms/distress may help reveal connections between food and IBS-D. You should take detailed notes that should include the types and amounts of foods eaten and the time of consumption. It’s important to also record the time and description of distressing bowel events or related pain and discomfort. Below are some dietary considerations which you may want to discuss with your doctor and/or registered dietitian.
  • High-fat foods may worsen symptoms of IBS-D
  • Dairy products – lactose free products may be better tolerated
  • Avoid alcohol
  • A reduction of caffeine may be beneficial. This includes caffeinated drinks, such as coffee, tea, colas and energy drinks
  • Sorbitol sweeteners (found in some chewing gum) may be problematic
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Probiotic supplements such as lactobacillus acidophilus may help alleviate IBS symptoms including abdominal pain, bloating, and bowel movement irregularity. Ask your health care professional for more information.
  • A diet low in FODMAPs (fermentable oligo-saccharides, di-saccharides, mono-saccharides, and polyols), a group of short-chain carbohydrates, may help relieve symptoms. The diet is used in the short-term followed by re-introduction to assess tolerance to individual foods. Consult your health-care professional for more information.
  • Eating large meals also may trigger abdominal cramping and diarrhea. It’s best to eat smaller meals.
  • Fibre may be helpful in reducing symptoms of IBS-D. If a trial of a fiber supplement such as psyllium is used, fiber should be added gradually, because it initially may worsen bloating and gassiness. If you have IBS-D, look for foods with more soluble fiber, the type that takes longer to digest (such as that found in oats).
  • Stress is considered one of the triggers of IBS symptoms. Here are some healthy habits that may also help reduce IBS symptoms.
  • Exercise may improve and could reduce stress.
  • Get enough rest. This allows your body to maintain basic function, repair and manage stress.
  • Use relaxation techniques: deep breathing, visualization, Yoga.
  • Consult a professional trained in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Gut Directed Hypnotherapy.

Medications for IBS-D

While lifestyle and dietary changes can play a role in helping manage mild IBS-D symptoms, if your symptoms do not improve, you may require further intervention. Over the Counter (OTC) and prescription therapies are available for treating IBS-D.

OTC medications are recommended for short term/occasional use. If your symptoms are still unresolved, you should consult with your health care provider. With the right medication, you may find relief and prevent IBS-D from inhibiting your everyday activities and quality of life.

OTC therapies for IBS-D

  • Peppermint oil
  • probiotics
  • fiber
  • alpha galactosidase enzymes (e.g. Beano), simethicone, although efficacy with many products is not proven.

Prescription Drugs for IBS-D

IBS-D patients suffer from a multitude of symptoms including abdominal pain, bloating, and diarrhea. The commonly used prescription drugs only address a single symptom rather than the constellation of symptoms observed in IBS-D patients. Recent advancements in the treatment of IBS have produced newer medications that not only treat the multiple symptoms but have been specifically studied and approved for use by Health Canada in IBS-D patients.

Physicians may now prescribe one or a combination of drugs that:

  • reduce abdominal pain by blocking the pain signals to the brain
  • relax the muscles in the gut to reduce diarrhea and the urgent, uncontrollable need to use the washroom (urgency)
  • reduce both abdominal and bowel symptoms including pain, bloating, urgency and diarrhea Your doctor can determine if a combination or a single treatment is right for you.

Think you may have IBS? Read this article.

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