Lactose Intolerance

Signs and Symptoms

Familiar signs and symptoms include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Stomach cramps/pain
  • Bloating
  • Excessive gas

It is crucial to mention that each person’s symptoms may differ. Symptoms can begin as early as 30 minutes after dairy is consumed or can be delayed up to 2 hours after consumption. It is important to be aware of these symptoms and triggers because the pain and discomfort could ultimately lead to a lower quality of life.

Below are common foods along with their associated lactose percentages:

Whole Milk13 grams, per 1 cup (Brennan, 2020)
Cheddar Cheese0.4 to 0.6 grams, per 1 ounce (UpToDate, n.d.)
Ice Cream2 to 6 grams, per ½ cup (UpToDate, n.d.)
0% Yogurt4 to 17 grams, per 1 cup (UpToDate, n.d.)
Chocolate Milk12 grams, per 1 cup (Gupta, 2019)

Why can some people who are lactose intolerant consume some lactose products?

It depends on how much of the lactase enzyme one individual can produce. Lactase is the enzyme that breaks down lactose and turns it into glucose and galactose so that it can be absorbed. If an individual was able to form a low amount of lactase in their small intestine, they would still be deemed lactose intolerant. However, they could still in theory properly process and break down certain dairy products that have low lactose amounts. (Mayo Clinic, n.d.)

In the early stage of life, infants can produce their own lactase, especially those who are being fed mammalian milk. As infants get older, the production of lactase declines, and the individual loses the ability to digest lactose. A person can develop issues with lactose and dairy digestion at any point of the life. People may not have problems with lactose during early stages of life but may experience the symptoms after going through a chemotherapy session, after the use of antibiotics, or any kind of digestive infection could be a trigger point or a cause for lactose malabsorption during older age.


Students from the Culinary Management Nutrition Program at George Brown College Chef School participated in an academic writing content to create a lactose intolerance article for CDHF. The course, called Nutrition Issues, is taught by nutrition professor, Dr. Linda Gillis. Students highlighted the multicultural aspect of our nation and how lactose intolerance rates differ throughout Canada.  Their experience in planning meals using creative recipes is highlighted in this article.  Chante Grant and Mariana Schille were the winners for the contest.  George Brown College provides students with real world applications and opportunities for learning. Learn more more about Culinary Management Nutrition program.


References:

Brennan, D. (2020, October). Foods High in Lactose. WedMD. https://www.webmd.com/diet/foods-high-in-lactose#:~:text=Whole%20milk%20contains%20about%2013,between%2012%20and%2013%20grams.

UpToDate. (n.d.). Lactose content of different foods. UpToDate https://www.uptodate.com/contents/image?imageKey=PI%2F55938

Gupta, S. (2019, October). Chocolate Milk Nutrition Information. Livestrong. https://www.livestrong.com/article/46306-chocolate-milk-nutrition-information/

Mayo Clinic. (n.d.). Lactose intolerance.https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/lactose-intolerance/symptoms-causes/syc-20374232#:~:text=Too%20little%20of%20an%20enzyme,able%20to%20diges t%20milk%20products.

This content was made possible through partnership with  George Brown’s Culinary Management Nutrition Program and Lactalis.

Signs and Symptoms

Familiar signs and symptoms include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Stomach cramps/pain
  • Bloating
  • Excessive gas

It is crucial to mention that each person's symptoms may differ. Symptoms can begin as early as 30 minutes after dairy is consumed or can be delayed up to 2 hours after consumption. It is important to be aware of these symptoms and triggers because the pain and discomfort could ultimately lead to a lower quality of life.

Below are common foods along with their associated lactose percentages:

Whole Milk13 grams, per 1 cup (Brennan, 2020)
Cheddar Cheese0.4 to 0.6 grams, per 1 ounce (UpToDate, n.d.)
Ice Cream2 to 6 grams, per ½ cup (UpToDate, n.d.)
0% Yogurt4 to 17 grams, per 1 cup (UpToDate, n.d.)
Chocolate Milk12 grams, per 1 cup (Gupta, 2019)

Why can some people who are lactose intolerant consume some lactose products?

It depends on how much of the lactase enzyme one individual can produce. Lactase is the enzyme that breaks down lactose and turns it into glucose and galactose so that it can be absorbed. If an individual was able to form a low amount of lactase in their small intestine, they would still be deemed lactose intolerant. However, they could still in theory properly process and break down certain dairy products that have low lactose amounts. (Mayo Clinic, n.d.)

In the early stage of life, infants can produce their own lactase, especially those who are being fed mammalian milk. As infants get older, the production of lactase declines, and the individual loses the ability to digest lactose. A person can develop issues with lactose and dairy digestion at any point of the life. People may not have problems with lactose during early stages of life but may experience the symptoms after going through a chemotherapy session, after the use of antibiotics, or any kind of digestive infection could be a trigger point or a cause for lactose malabsorption during older age.


Students from the Culinary Management Nutrition Program at George Brown College Chef School participated in an academic writing content to create a lactose intolerance article for CDHF. The course, called Nutrition Issues, is taught by nutrition professor, Dr. Linda Gillis. Students highlighted the multicultural aspect of our nation and how lactose intolerance rates differ throughout Canada.  Their experience in planning meals using creative recipes is highlighted in this article.  Chante Grant and Mariana Schille were the winners for the contest.  George Brown College provides students with real world applications and opportunities for learning. Learn more more about Culinary Management Nutrition program.


References:

Brennan, D. (2020, October). Foods High in Lactose. WedMD. https://www.webmd.com/diet/foods-high-in-lactose#:~:text=Whole%20milk%20contains%20about%2013,between%2012%20and%2013%20grams.

UpToDate. (n.d.). Lactose content of different foods. UpToDate https://www.uptodate.com/contents/image?imageKey=PI%2F55938

Gupta, S. (2019, October). Chocolate Milk Nutrition Information. Livestrong. https://www.livestrong.com/article/46306-chocolate-milk-nutrition-information/

Mayo Clinic. (n.d.). Lactose intolerance.https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/lactose-intolerance/symptoms-causes/syc-20374232#:~:text=Too%20little%20of%20an%20enzyme,able%20to%20diges t%20milk%20products.