Lactose Intolerance

Statistics

Statistics on lactose intolerance

  • Lactose is a natural sugar found in milk. Individuals who are lactose intolerant lack the enzyme (lactase) to break down this sugar for absorption. Lactose then gets into the large bowel (colon) and may cause gas, bloating, diarrhea and abdominal cramping. Sometimes lactose intolerance occurs after digestive infections.
  • Lactose intolerance is associated with lower quality of life. (Casellas et al. 2016)
  • The true prevalence of lactose intolerance is unknown. In a national Canadian survey, 16% of participants perceived that they had lactose intolerence. (Barr 2013)
  • Lactose intolerance is more prevalent among African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, and Native Americans, and less common among those of European descent. (Suchy et al. 2010)
  • Elimination of milk and milk products is not necessary in lactose intolerance. In general, individuals may tolerate at least 12 g of lactose when administered in a single dose (equivalent to the lactose content in 1 cup of milk). Larger amounts of lactose may be tolerated if ingested with meals and distributed throughout the day. (Suchy et al. 2010)

Students from the Culinary Management Nutrition Program at George Brown College Chef School participated in an academic writing content to create a lactose intolerance article for CDHF. The course, called Nutrition Issues, is taught by nutrition professor, Dr. Linda Gillis. Students highlighted the multicultural aspect of our nation and how lactose intolerance rates differ throughout Canada.  Their experience in planning meals using creative recipes is highlighted in this article.  Chante Grant and Mariana Schille were the winners for the contest.  George Brown College provides students with real world applications and opportunities for learning. Learn more more about Culinary Management Nutrition program.

This content was made possible through partnership with  George Brown’s Culinary Management Nutrition Program and Lactalis.

Statistics

Statistics on lactose intolerance

  • Lactose is a natural sugar found in milk. Individuals who are lactose intolerant lack the enzyme (lactase) to break down this sugar for absorption. Lactose then gets into the large bowel (colon) and may cause gas, bloating, diarrhea and abdominal cramping. Sometimes lactose intolerance occurs after digestive infections.
  • Lactose intolerance is associated with lower quality of life. (Casellas et al. 2016)
  • The true prevalence of lactose intolerance is unknown. In a national Canadian survey, 16% of participants perceived that they had lactose intolerence. (Barr 2013)
  • Lactose intolerance is more prevalent among African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, and Native Americans, and less common among those of European descent. (Suchy et al. 2010)
  • Elimination of milk and milk products is not necessary in lactose intolerance. In general, individuals may tolerate at least 12 g of lactose when administered in a single dose (equivalent to the lactose content in 1 cup of milk). Larger amounts of lactose may be tolerated if ingested with meals and distributed throughout the day. (Suchy et al. 2010)

Students from the Culinary Management Nutrition Program at George Brown College Chef School participated in an academic writing content to create a lactose intolerance article for CDHF. The course, called Nutrition Issues, is taught by nutrition professor, Dr. Linda Gillis. Students highlighted the multicultural aspect of our nation and how lactose intolerance rates differ throughout Canada.  Their experience in planning meals using creative recipes is highlighted in this article.  Chante Grant and Mariana Schille were the winners for the contest.  George Brown College provides students with real world applications and opportunities for learning. Learn more more about Culinary Management Nutrition program.