IBD: Crohn's Disease

November is IBD Awareness Month

Étiquettes :

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) represents a group of intestinal disorders that cause inflammation (redness and swelling) and ulceration (sores) of the small and large intestines. The two most common disorders are called Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

These disorders are sometimes called invisible illnesses because their symptoms are difficult for others to see. Awareness is the first step to understanding, so below, we have outlined what it’s like for someone to live with IBD. It’s important to note that Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis can affect each person differently. Below are the most common signs and symptoms of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

What causes IBD?

The exact cause of IBD is unknown. However, it is believed to be due to a combination of factors, including a person’s genes (inherited traits) and triggers in the environment. This interaction of genetic and environmental factors activates an abnormal response of the body’s immune system.

Normally, the immune system protects the body from infection. In people with ulcerative colitis, however, the immune system can mistake microbes (such as bacteria that are normally found in the intestines), food, and other material in the intestines, as invading substances.

When this happens, the body launches an attack, sending white blood cells into the lining of the intestines where they cause inflammation and ulcerations.

If you have just been diagnosed, it’s important to know that you are not alone. Canada has one of the highest incidences and prevalence rates of IBD in the world with more than 200,000 Canadians living with the disease.

This awareness month, CDHF needs your help to support our IBD nurses.

Nurses are an integral part of the health-care system. Not only do they deliver outstanding care and support to patients and their families, they also advocate on their behalf every single day. They work to make sure their patients receive the best possible care and are committed to improving the quality of care that will be available in the future. 

The specially trained IBD nurse understands the pathogenesis and presentation of IBD, has up-to-date knowledge of treatment options, appreciates the role of nutrition in IBD management and can draw on this knowledge to formulate and discuss treatment plans with patients. The IBD nurse specialist represents a valuable component of the multidisciplinary care team yet these specialists are currently scarce in Canada, 88 currently documented. 

The CDHF is currently conducting a study which will assess the depth of impact IBD nurses have on the health and quality of life of IBD patients and their caregivers. We seek to better understand the challenges IBD nurses face, the impacts of nurse-led research on patient care, cost savings they provide to provincial healthcare systems and identify opportunities to prioritize the recruitment of nurses into the field of IBD.

As front-liners in IBD care and with the rates of diagnosis continually rising, there has never been a more pressing time to provide evidence-based solutions and recommendations that will support the communities of people living with IBD in Canada. In highlighting the multi-layered value IBD nurses provide, from timely and equitable access to IBD services and care to patient advocacy, IBD nurses are the health champions we need to deliver best in class care and position Canada to be an international leader in the field. 

If you have IBD, care for someone with IBD, or are a nurse or gastroenterologist – please take our confidential survey for IBD Awareness Month.

Do you have Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)?

Please take our Patient Survey

Duration: 10 minutes

Please help us by completing this confidential survey.

Are you a Caregiver of someone with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)?

Please take our Caregiver Survey

Duration: 10 minutes

Please help us by completing this confidential survey

Are you a Gastroenterologist?

Please take our GI Survey

Duration: 10 minutes

Please help us by completing this confidential survey

Are you an IBD Nurse?

Please take our Nurse Survey

Duration: 10 minutes

Please help us by completing this confidential survey

You can help those living with IBD enjoy a healthy, happy fulfilling life by learning more about the disease and encouraging others to do the same. Click the links below to learn more:

To donate IBD awareness initiatives please click below.

November is IBD Awareness Month

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) represents a group of intestinal disorders that cause inflammation (redness and swelling) and ulceration (sores) of the small and large intestines. The two most common disorders are called Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

These disorders are sometimes called invisible illnesses because their symptoms are difficult for others to see. Awareness is the first step to understanding, so below, we have outlined what it’s like for someone to live with IBD. It’s important to note that Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis can affect each person differently. Below are the most common signs and symptoms of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

What causes IBD?

The exact cause of IBD is unknown. However, it is believed to be due to a combination of factors, including a person’s genes (inherited traits) and triggers in the environment. This interaction of genetic and environmental factors activates an abnormal response of the body’s immune system.

Normally, the immune system protects the body from infection. In people with ulcerative colitis, however, the immune system can mistake microbes (such as bacteria that are normally found in the intestines), food, and other material in the intestines, as invading substances.

When this happens, the body launches an attack, sending white blood cells into the lining of the intestines where they cause inflammation and ulcerations.

If you have just been diagnosed, it’s important to know that you are not alone. Canada has one of the highest incidences and prevalence rates of IBD in the world with more than 200,000 Canadians living with the disease.

This awareness month, CDHF needs your help to support our IBD nurses.

Nurses are an integral part of the health-care system. Not only do they deliver outstanding care and support to patients and their families, they also advocate on their behalf every single day. They work to make sure their patients receive the best possible care and are committed to improving the quality of care that will be available in the future. 

The specially trained IBD nurse understands the pathogenesis and presentation of IBD, has up-to-date knowledge of treatment options, appreciates the role of nutrition in IBD management and can draw on this knowledge to formulate and discuss treatment plans with patients. The IBD nurse specialist represents a valuable component of the multidisciplinary care team yet these specialists are currently scarce in Canada, 88 currently documented. 

The CDHF is currently conducting a study which will assess the depth of impact IBD nurses have on the health and quality of life of IBD patients and their caregivers. We seek to better understand the challenges IBD nurses face, the impacts of nurse-led research on patient care, cost savings they provide to provincial healthcare systems and identify opportunities to prioritize the recruitment of nurses into the field of IBD.

As front-liners in IBD care and with the rates of diagnosis continually rising, there has never been a more pressing time to provide evidence-based solutions and recommendations that will support the communities of people living with IBD in Canada. In highlighting the multi-layered value IBD nurses provide, from timely and equitable access to IBD services and care to patient advocacy, IBD nurses are the health champions we need to deliver best in class care and position Canada to be an international leader in the field. 

If you have IBD, care for someone with IBD, or are a nurse or gastroenterologist - please take our confidential survey for IBD Awareness Month.

Do you have Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)?

Please take our Patient Survey

Duration: 10 minutes

Please help us by completing this confidential survey.

Are you a Caregiver of someone with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)?

Please take our Caregiver Survey

Duration: 10 minutes

Please help us by completing this confidential survey

Are you a Gastroenterologist?

Please take our GI Survey

Duration: 10 minutes

Please help us by completing this confidential survey

Are you an IBD Nurse?

Please take our Nurse Survey

Duration: 10 minutes

Please help us by completing this confidential survey

You can help those living with IBD enjoy a healthy, happy fulfilling life by learning more about the disease and encouraging others to do the same. Click the links below to learn more:

To donate IBD awareness initiatives please click below.