Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Understanding the FODMAP Diet

In this handy printable resource, CDHF covers the basics of the FODMAP diet.

What does FODMAP mean?

FODMAPs are a group of small carbohydrate (sugar) molecules found in everyday foods. Carbohydrates are made up of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen and provide an important source of energy for the body. FODMAP carbohydrates that may be poorly absorbed in the small intestine of some people.

FODMAPs move through the digestive tract to the large intestine (colon), where they can draw water into the colon and are rapidly fermented (digested) by naturally-occurring gut bacteria. The fermentation of FODMAPs produces gas and other by-products. It is estimated that 50% of people with IBS may benefit from a low FODMAPs diet, however, the quality of scientific evidence is very low. Of these people, there is a possible benefit for overall symptoms such as abdominal pain, cramping, bloating, excess gas, constipation and/or diarrhea.

Download and print this resource to help you understand the FODMAP diet. Complete with easy to reference cheat sheets of common low FODMAP food options, as well as a list of foods to avoid, this resource is a great opportunity for those who are new to the diet to learn the basics.

This guide is meant to explain the basics only, and CDHF encourages any IBS patients who are thinking about attempting this elimination diet for themselves to do so under the guidance of a registered dietitian.

Understanding the FODMAP Diet

In this handy printable resource, CDHF covers the basics of the FODMAP diet.

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What does FODMAP mean?

FODMAPs are a group of small carbohydrate (sugar) molecules found in everyday foods. Carbohydrates are made up of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen and provide an important source of energy for the body. FODMAP carbohydrates that may be poorly absorbed in the small intestine of some people.

FODMAPs move through the digestive tract to the large intestine (colon), where they can draw water into the colon and are rapidly fermented (digested) by naturally-occurring gut bacteria. The fermentation of FODMAPs produces gas and other by-products. It is estimated that 50% of people with IBS may benefit from a low FODMAPs diet, however, the quality of scientific evidence is very low. Of these people, there is a possible benefit for overall symptoms such as abdominal pain, cramping, bloating, excess gas, constipation and/or diarrhea.

Download and print this resource to help you understand the FODMAP diet. Complete with easy to reference cheat sheets of common low FODMAP food options, as well as a list of foods to avoid, this resource is a great opportunity for those who are new to the diet to learn the basics.

This guide is meant to explain the basics only, and CDHF encourages any IBS patients who are thinking about attempting this elimination diet for themselves to do so under the guidance of a registered dietitian.

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